Good Mirroring —— Bad Mirroring

Posted by on Jan 20, 2015 in Resources | 0 comments

GOOD MIRRORING —— BAD MIRRORING

Good Mirroring from our friend Richard Hughesby Richard Hughes

Richard Rohr in his book “Readings for Lent” talks about the Good or Bad Mirroring we have of God, which we receive from various sources, including the Church and the Scriptures themselves. An angry, displeased, judgemental, revengeful God – or a loving, accepting God.

A picture of Good Mirroring is that of a mother smiling and looking at her young child and the child kicking its legs and smiling back — returning the GAZE. How sad when the mother’s look, for whatever reason, is one of resentment, rejection or anger. What sort of GAZE will the child mirror back and eventually project on to others?

Many years ago I was flying from London to New York. The weather in London was as bad as it gets in England – dark, low lying clouds and pouring rain. As the plane took off it had to fly through all this muck until suddenly it burst through into a bright blue sky and the ever-present shining sun.

A good picture of all the “stuff” – the Bad Mirroring – we tend to put between the ever-present God and ourselves. Our prejudices, our unworthiness, our theologies, our debates for or against the existence of God, even our own religion and in our own Anglican Church the feud between the Diocese of Sydney and the rest of the Anglican Communion. All the things that prevent us from returning the gaze of a loving God.

Our ” GAZE” back on God is at best blurred – as St. Paul puts it: “Now we see through a glass darkly” but there will come a time when “I shall know even as I am known” and I will return the GAZE of the God whose “nature is always to have mercy” and whose love shines out on all alike, regardless of race or creed.

If we haven’t allowed ourselves to be loved – if we haven’t returned the GAZE – we are, as St. Paul would put it like “a loud noisy gong”. Whatever our achievements, whatever our gifts, without love — we are nothing.

Tradition has it that St. John at the end of his life had just one message – a three-word sermon – GOD IS LOVE.

As I approach my own death I have a great sense of peace, and an awareness of the presence of the God who loves and accepts me, who loves and accepts each one of us, just as we are, warts and all.

All we can really do is to let God manifest himself through the unique person that each of us is, and to return the GAZE.

Let me end by giving you a BLESSING:

May the Lord bless you and keep you
May the Lord make his face to shine upon you,
And give you peace.
May the Blessing of God Father, Son and
Holy Spirit
Be with you now and always. AMEN.

 

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